Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Audubon Day May 3rd! Fly on By!

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Audubon_scoop!

The LSU Libraries will host a special viewing of the famed double elephant folio edition of John James Audubon’s Birds of America (London, 1827-1838).  The viewing will be held in the McIlhenny Room of Hill Memorial Library on the LSU campus, on Saturday, May 3, 2014 from 10 am until 2 pm, and is free and open to the public with a reservation.

In addition to the viewing of Birds of America (and a few selected illustrated rare books), this year during Audubon Day, visitors will have the opportunity to view the new travelling exhibition which will be of interest to Audubon and bird enthusiasts. “I Remember: An Art Show of Environmental Significance,” produced by the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) Task Force in partnership with LSU Libraries’ T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History. The exhibition features oral histories, photographs and original art depicting individuals who work, live, and play in Louisiana’s coastal wetlands.  Archival materials from LSU Libraries Special Collections complement “I Remember.”  A full description of the exhibition is available here: http://exhibitions.blogs.lib.lsu.edu/?page_id=798

A renowned masterpiece of natural history art, the Birds of America records the rich bird and plant life Audubon saw and drew first-hand when he lived in Louisiana in the 1820s. The edition is known as the “elephant” folio because of its large size, with each of its 435 pages measuring 39 by 27 inches. Publication took eleven years, from 1827 to 1838. LSU’s copy of the Birds was purchased with a grant from the Crown Zellerbach Foundation in 1964, and it has been shown in various venues over the years.

In 2007, it was determined that LSU’s copy could no longer be shown safely due to structural damage to the bindings caused by their large size and other problems with individual plates.  In 2008, the Coypu Foundation made a donation of $99,000 to enable conservation of this work by Etherington Conservation Services.  Over the course of more than a year, the work was painstakingly completed. The final volume returned to the library on December 28, 2009. Thanks to the Coypu Foundation, one of the Libraries’ greatest treasures is now restored to fine condition and can again be shared with our community.

As part of the Audubon Day festivities, participating artists Lane Lefort (photographer) and Marian Brister Martinez (painter) will be on hand in the exhibit gallery to discuss their work currently on display as part of the “I Remember” exhibition. A representative from Marsh Dog will be available to talk about the company’s nutria-based dog food products, and its founding as a creative economic solution to address coastal wetlands loss.

CWPPRA is federal legislation enacted in 1990 that is designed to identify, prepare, and fund construction of coastal wetlands restoration projects.  Since its inception, 151 coastal restoration or protection projects have been authorized, benefiting over 112,000 acres in Louisiana.

For more information on CWPPRA, visit lacoast.gov.

It is with pleasure that the Hill Memorial Library shares these remarkable volumes with the community. Audubon Day events are free and the public is welcome, but reservations are required and space is limited.  Viewings of the folio volumes are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 noon, and 1 p.m. Only 40 people can be admitted for each showing.  Parking is readily accessible in the Indian Mounds lot, directly behind Hill Memorial Library.   To request a reservation, visit the Libraries’ Special Collections website at http://www.lib.lsu.edu/special/audubon or call 225-578-6544 during business hours.

As an additional related lagniappe, on Sunday, May 4th, the day after LSU Libraries Special Collections’ Audubon Day, Bike Baton Rouge will lead a Vélo des Oiseaux (bird ride) under the guidance of Professor Phil Strouffer, ornithologist and ecologist at the LSU School of Renewable Natural Resources.

The group will meet at 4th Street and Spanish Town Road (the State Museum) at 8.00 AM, Sunday, May 4th. They will ride to the Capitol lakes to see what birds are active on the little lake across from the Governor’s mansion then head to the lake on the north side of the Capitol to see what’s there. From the Capitol we’ll head to the Levee Path and LSU. They will stop along the way where bird life is acitve. They may continue all the way down to the eagle nest by Farr Park. From the Levee they will come back to town via the University/City Park Lakes. Expect at least two and a half to three hours for the ride, though not continuous riding. Anyone under the age of 12 is required by law to wear a helmet. Bring water and a snack to share with others. Binoculars are useful though there will be a spotting telescope on hand.

 

Hoops and History at Hill: Saturday, February 1st

Monday, January 27th, 2014

 

1981_Basketball_Team

Where: Hill Memorial Library Lecture Hall, LSU Campus
When: Saturday, February 1, 2014, 2-3 p.m.
Before 4 p.m. tip-off at the PMAC
What:
Hoops and History: talk show host Jim Engster interviews former LSU basketball coach Dale Brown (1972-1981) and LSU basketball legend Rudy Macklin (1976-1981)

The event is free and open to the public and will include a reception and giveaway.

For more information contact Hill Memorial Library at 225-578-6544 or jlacherfeldman@lsu.edu

LSU Libraries Special Collections is the place to learn about the university’s history, and this pre-game library event is all about a historical era in Tiger’s basketball.

Rudy Macklin played at LSU between 1976 and 1981, going on to play in the NBA, first for the Atlanta Hawks, then for the New York Knicks. Macklin is one of only four men’s basketball players to have his jersey retired by LSU. Macklin, under coach Dale Brown, led LSU to the Final Four in 1981, and was the 1981 SEC Player of the Year. Macklin retired from basketball to become a banker in Baton Rouge. He is also involved in the Louisiana Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

Coach Dale Brown retired from LSU in 1997 after twenty-five years as men’s basketball coach. Leading teams to seventeen consecutive non-losing seasons, and to fifteen straight national tournaments, Coach Brown was named SEC Coach of the Year or runner up nine times, and was twice named National Basketball Coach of the Year. In his retirement, he has made numerous public appearances, speaking to groups of all kinds.

Hill’s own Barry Cowan Shares New LSU Book 12/21

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Louisiana State University by Barry CowanJoin us on Saturday, December 21, 2013 from 10:30 am – noon for an exciting event celebrating the publication of Assistant University Archivist Barry Cowan’s new book, “Louisiana State University.” The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place from 10:30 am to noon in the Hill Memorial Library Lecture Hall.

During this special event, Cowan will offer a short talk about the book and share images and anecdotes. Copies of the book will be on sale and Barry will be signing copies for visitors. A reception will follow the talk. “I hope the book will provide not only entertainment, but also the opportunity for people to learn about LSU’s long and colorful history in an interesting and accessible way,” Cowan said. “The book is certainly meant to educate, but it is also my hope that the photographs herein will bring back fond memories and allow people to reminisce about their times at LSU.”

The newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s Campus History Series, “Louisiana State University” features a foreword by former LSU System President and Chancellor William L. Jenkins. The 128-page, soft-cover book boasts more than 200 vintage images of the LSU campus throughout its history. For the book, Cowan selected images from the LSU Archives and the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley collections in the LSU Libraries’ Special Collections at Hill Memorial Library.

Highlights of the book include, among others, displays of rarely seen before images, most of which came from the collections in the LSU Libraries’ Special Collections in Hill Memorial Library; highlights the four campuses since LSU’s inception in 1860; how the university had mandatory ROTC until 1969; how the baseball team – not the football team – was the first to wear the school’s signature purple and gold in 1893.

The book is a perfect holiday gift for any LSU fan or friend, young and old, and is an informative and interesting look at the long and fascinating history of Louisiana State University.  The event also marks the closing of our current Lecture Hall exhibition, which Cowan co-curated, Saturday Night in Tiger Stadium, which ends on December 23, 2013.

Ample parking is available behind Hill Memorial Library for the event.   For more information contact us at 225-578-6544 or via email at jlacherfeldman@lsu.edu.

 

 

La Langue Mondiale: A New Exhibit at Hill

Monday, November 4th, 2013

lalanguemondiale
LSU Libraries Special Collections, in association with the LSU School of Art, presents a collaborative exhibition titled: La langue mondiale: French as the Language of Art and Thought, November 4, 2013 – March 8, 2014 in Hill Memorial Library.

La langue mondiale is a multi-faceted exhibition exploring French contributions to and influence on art, culture, and science over the centuries from Europe to Louisiana. Art history students, under Professor of Art History, Darius Speith, curated materials in the first floor gallery, examining artistic life in nineteenth-century Paris from a literary perspective.

The second floor gallery, curated by Head of Special Collections Jessica Lacher-Feldman and Assistant Curator of Books, Michael Taylor, features major scientific works, such as volumes of Diderot’s Encyclopédie, Buffon’s Natural History, and Description de L’Egypte, a record of the scientific expedition that accompanied Napoleon in Egypt. Rare early French dictionaries and works by19th century Louisiana Creole authors will also be on display, as well as a glimpse at Lafcadio Hearn’s Gombo Zhebes, a rare and colorful 19th book of Creole proverbs, along with their French and English translations.

The opening of the exhibition coincides with the lecture by French historian and essayist, Marc Fumaroli, member of L’Académie française and author of numerous works, including When the World Spoke French. The lecture is sponsored by the LSU College of Art and Design and the LSU Department of French Studies and will be held in the Union Theatre on November 4 at 5 pm.  The reception for this talk, which will serve as the opening for this exhibit, will take place at Hill Memorial Library immediately following the talk. Click here for details.

Ghost Stories at Hill! Join us!

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

decaro_banner_hill

Join us on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 for a talk and reading with Folklorist and LSU Professor Emeritus Frank Decaro. A book signing and halloween candy reception will follow. The talk will begin at 5:30 pm. This event is free and open to the public. Frank de Caro is professor emeritus of English at Louisiana State University. A folklorist by training, he served as president of the Louisiana Folklore Society and editor of the Louisiana Folklore Miscellany.

Originally printed in 1944, DeCaro reintroduces this classic volume, Ghost Stories of New Orleans, by Jeanne deLavigne (d. 1962), which has been republished by LSU Press (October 2013).

Drawing largely on popular legend dating back to the 1800s, deLavigne provides vivid details of old New Orleans with a cast of spirits that represent the ethnic mélange of the city set amid period homes, historic neighborhoods, and forgotten taverns. Combining folklore, newspaper accounts, and deLavigne’s own voice, these phantasmal tales range from the tragic—brothers, lost at sea as children, haunt a chapel on Thomas Street in search of their mother—to graphic depictions of torture, mutilation, and death.

Folklorist and foreword contributor Frank de Caro places the writer and her work in context for modern readers. He uncovers new information about deLavigne’s life and describes her book’s pervasive lingering influence on the Crescent City’s culture today.

A New Orleans native, Jeanne deLavigne (d. 1962) also collaborated with Jacques Rutherford on the novels And the Garden Waited and Fox Fire.

A small exhibition of ghostly items from Hill Memorial Library will be on display just for this event!

See more about this book at: http://lsupress.org/books/detail/ghost-stories-of-old-new-orleans/#sthash.Ea4KUsFz.dpuf

Shake It Up and Read All About It!

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

 

shake_it_Hill_banner

 

Join us at Hill Memorial Library for a fascinating night of football and earthquake talk with two speakers! Sam King, longtime Baton Rouge sportswriter, and LSU Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics Juan Lorenzo will come together to talk about LSU Football, seismology, and the legendary “Earthquake Game” of October, 1988.

Shake It Up and Read All About It! LSU Football and the “Earthquake” at Tiger Stadium will touch upon  the memorable 1988 “Earthquake Game”,  LSU Sports coverage in general through the eyes of legendary Baton Rouge sportswriter, Sam King, and a glimpse at seismology and athletic events with Dr. Lorenzo and his Seismeauxbile.

This event will take place on Tuesday, October 15, 2013 in LSU Libraries Special Collections in Hill Memorial Library.  The event is free and open to the public.

Held in conjunction with our exhibit, “Saturday Night in Tiger Stadium”, the exhibit, including our first ever touchscreen display, will be available to view. See the real seismogram from the 1988 Earthquake game. Copies of Sam King’s new book, Tiger Beat: Covering LSU Sports for 35 Years (Acadian House, 2013) will be available for purchase and signing. A reception and signing will follow the talks.  This event will surely have something for everyone! Also in attendance, the famed SEISMEAUXBILE, which will be parked in front of Hill Memorial Library just for this event!

 

Earthquake Game Anniversary Button Giveaway!

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

buttons_earthquake!

In honor of the 25th anniversary of the famed “Earthquake Game”, and our new exhibit opening Monday, “Saturday Night in Tiger Stadium”, LSU Libraries Special Collections is giving away some commemorative buttons and magnets today and tomorrow. Spread the word. All you need to do is Like us on Facebook, and then come to Hill Memorial Library and tell the person at the reception desk that you have “liked us on Facebook” — and they will give you a pin or a magnet celebrating the anniversary of the Earthquake game against Auburn. Wear to to the game on Saturday!

Our button giveaway is today and tomorrow (9/19 and 9/20) only and supplies are limited. We want to get to 1000 likes by Friday at 5 pm. Let’s make that happen! Geaux Tigers! And we will be making more cool buttons to give away in the future.  Stop by and see us!

Join Us for a Special Collections Open House!

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Open House graphic

 

On Tuesday October 1, 2013 from 2:30-5:30 pm, LSU Libraries Special Collections will host an Open House event.  This is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the general public to stop by and visit the Hill Memorial Library, meet the faculty, staff and students who work here, and learn more about what we do and what our library holds.

The event will feature demonstrations of some of the work we do, including minor conservation work such as making enclosures; processing and cataloging; digitizing and microfilming; as well as information and the demonstration of projects and areas that fall under Special Collections, including the T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History; the Civil War Book Review; and two important grant projects relating to digitizing newspapers, and the collaborative NEH grant to digitize materials relating to Louisiana’s Free People of Color.

As part of the Open House, we will also be showcasing some of our favorite things from the collections, allowing visitors to see rare and unique items, and to talk with curators and other staff about our holdings and how the materials at Hill can help further research and scholarship at every level.   The Open House is an opportunity to share some of the ‘special collections superlatives’ such as our oldest, smallest, largest, and most intriguing items.  This is just a small sampling of what is available to all at Hill, but it is a fun way to show off some select interesting rare and unique materials.

For example, did you know that the library has a photograph of Varina Davis (a daguerreotype) from the late 1840s –  just a few years after the invention of photography?

The Hill Memorial Library is home to over 5000 manuscript collections, including political papers of such notable Louisianans as Huey and Russell Long and John Breaux.  It also is home to rare documents that help illustrate the very beginnings of Louisiana statehood, such as the Claiborne Letter Book, as well as materials that document the Civil Rights struggle in Louisiana.  The library is also a place to learn about books, from “incunabula” (books printed before the year 1501 – in the era of Gutenberg and the invention of moveable type), to comic books, modern artists’ books, and works of science fiction and fantasy.  There are many, many surprises, including one of largest and most comprehensive collections on the game of poker held anywhere.

“Special Collections is open to all — all of the time.  This library is here for everyone, and we welcome everyone to come and take advantage of the infinite resources available in Hill. We thought that this Open House would be a good way to share some interesting things about the collections and the work that we do in a new way,”  said the newly appointed Head of Special Collections, Jessica Lacher-Feldman.  “I see this as a unique opportunity to engage users and potential users in a casual way.  I feel its important to know that you don’t always need a reason or need to see something specific to visit special collections.  Come in, look around, and talk to us.  I am looking forward to meeting new people from across campus during the Open House, and hope it will spark further interest in using the collections for research, projects, and in creative and new ways.  Come in to see what’s special about Special Collections.  The answer, in a nutshell, is everything!”

In addition to the collections, projects, and processes, there will be two exhibits going on in Hill’s gallery areas.  “Centuries of Style: A RETROspective of Dress” is a two part exhibit that features the photography of LSU alum Jane McCowan on the first floor.  The second floor features images from throughout our collections that reflect sartorial choices and fashions from throughout the world, from ancient times to the 20th century.  The second exhibit, which opens on September 23 is entitled “Saturday Night in Tiger Stadium” commemorates the 25th anniversary of the 1988 football game, now widely known as the Earthquake Game.  The original seismogram will be on display in the exhibit. It can also be viewed in the LOUISiana Digital Library at http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p120701coll24/id/323/rec/20.

The Open House is meant for all — come by for a few minutes, or stay as long as you like.  This event is held in conjunction with the celebration of American Archives Month, a national celebration of the power and significance of archives. For more information about the Open House, contact Jessica Lacher-Feldman at jlacherfeldman@lsu.edu or at (225) 578-6544.

 

Special Collections Co-Sponsors 2013 Historic Natchez Conference, April 17-20

Monday, April 8th, 2013

LSU Special Collections is proud to co-sponsor “From Civil War to Civil Rights,” the 2013 Historic Natchez Conference, April 17-20, 2013.

Natchez Under the Hill, Gandy Collection, Mss. 3778.

Natchez Under the Hill, Gandy Collection, Mss. 3778.

Headquartered at the Eola Hotel in downtown Natchez, the meeting offers a full program of free lectures on centuries of Natchez and the Lower Mississippi Valley’s history, narrowing to a particular focus on the American Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement.

The keynote speaker, William C. Davis, will speak on the Civil War at its sesquicentennial. Setting the stage for the antebellum era, scholars will discuss the archeology of the Natchez area, steamboat transportation on the Mississippi River in the early 18th century, and empire in the Colonial Natchez period. Additional presentations examine political violence and armed conflict during the Civil War and post-bellum era, occupation of Natchez by federal troops, African American sailors serving in the Mississippi Squadron, merchants and the rebuilding of Natchez after the war, and plantation life. In relation to the latter, LSU Special Collections Assistant Curator of Books Michael Taylor will present “The Library of Rosedown Plantation: A Case Study in Researching Nineteenth-Century Private Libraries.” Further program highlights explore the 1965 Natchez boycott, the Mississippi Freedom Movement, and social and religious aspects of civil rights activism in Natchez. The conference will also feature a screening of the documentary film When I Rise.

Visit http://www.natchez.org/historic_natchez_conference.htm for full program information and to register. Though there is no charge to attend the talks, registration is requested and you must purchase a ticket for the receptions.

The Historic Natchez Conference fosters the study, preservation, and appreciation of the Natchez region by providing a forum for established scholars, graduate students, archivists, and the general public to share research, resources, and ideas. The meeting, which has been held almost biennially since 1994, continues its tradition of highlighting the role of archival collections in researching and interpreting the history of the American South. Natchez is heavily represented in the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, which is the largest division within Special Collections. See our subject guide on Natchez for additional information about these collections.

Conference co-sponsors include California State University, Northridge; Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin; Historic Natchez Foundation; Mississippi Department of Archives and History; Natchez National Historical Park; and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The Natchez Eola Hotel is offering a special conference rate of $89/night: (601 )445-6000 or www.natchezeola.com. For registration information and more details, contact the Historic Natchez Foundation: (601) 442-2500, hnf@natchez.org, www.natchez.org.

Exhibition Lagniappe: Looking at “Late Bloomers”

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

The LSU Libraries invites you to “Looking at Late Bloomers,” a gallery talk and reception in Hill Memorial Library on the LSU campus, Wednesday, February 20, at 5 p.m. The event marks the end of the current exhibition, “Late Bloomers,” featuring Margaret Stones’ watercolor drawings of fall and winter blooming plants from the “Native Flora of Louisiana Collection.”

Beginning at 5:15, LSU Chancellor Emeritus Paul Murrill will speak briefly about the Native Flora project, which began during his administration, and introduce Lowell Urbatsch, LSU professor of botany and chief scientific advisor for the project. Urbatsch will share stories of collecting plant materials, talk about the plants, and discuss how the Stones drawings are useful to botanists, contributing to the body of scientific knowledge.

Artist Margaret Stones spent 51 years working as a freelance artist with Kew Gardens, London, and their botanical publication “Curtis’ Botanical Magazine.” In addition to the “Native Flora of Louisiana, ” she created the monumental “Endemic Flora of Tasmania” on a private commission for the Baron de Malahide during her tenure at Kew. She is a member of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) and the Order of Australia and was the recipient of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Veitch Silver and Gold Memorial Medals as well as the Eloise Payne Luquer Medal sponsored by the Garden Club of America. Many of the watercolor drawings in the Louisiana collection have been loaned for exhibitions at the Smithsonian Museum, museums in Great Britain, and at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

To reserve parking near the library for this free event, please call 578-6552 or 578-2217 before noon on Feb. 18.


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